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‘Plant-Based Food’: Made From Real Plants!

Metabolize your OWN BODY using this one weird trick! Steve Green brings us the breaking news: there are now foods available — without filling out forms or even a requiring a doctor’s prescription! — that are available over the counter and which are made out of REAL PLANTS! Just like celebrities eat! It’s the crazy diet plan that’s sweeping the nation!

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Eowyn Storm
January 15, 2024 12:57 PM

You know I almost never comment on your shows. But I must protest! You guys are SO far off the mark on this one! Peanut Butter should simply consist of peanuts and salt. Chunky only. No sugar or vegetable oil or any other nonsense. I’m eating my simple, pure, pristine, one might almost say Holy, natural, sugar-free, chunky peanut butter right now, with a spoon. I’m out of crackers.

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Eowyn Storm
January 15, 2024 2:58 PM

Ah, another food snob heard from. As long as the ingredients are not harmful what goes into making peanut butter is a matter of personal preference. It’s not “best” your way, that’s just one way to make it and YOU like it best for whatever reasons happen to be your own. There’s nothing “Holy” about your peanut butter, sorry. I would not agree with you anymore than I’d agree with someone who says steaks should be ONLY cooked over an open wood fire with ONLY salt added. To my thinking that might be mega-paleo but it’s also a way to… Read more »

Tim Scott
January 15, 2024 10:41 AM

I am sure I am among a vast minority: I like peanuts, but do not like peanut butter. I think it is whatever they add to peanuts or a nut to make it butter is what I do not like. I grew up in a small town that was in farming country, so I know where food comes from. I even raised sheep for 4-H for years and like to eat lamb. As for the term “tuck patch”: according to something I just found on a homesteading site, a truck patch was a garden that you harvested and sold from… Read more »

ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 6:12 AM

Farming was the great appeal of America to European immigrants. Many were tenant farmers who worked the land for the landowner. The landowner took his share in rent no matter the state of the annual crop yield. If that year’s crops were good it didn’t hurt so much, if they were bad it hurt a lot. People’s children starved to death to pay the land rent when yields were down. They worked like beasts and often barely managed to survive. The idea of moving to America where they could not only own their own farm but the very land it… Read more »

Bill Thompson
January 14, 2024 5:51 PM

RE the technical term for the extrusion nub in the top of a virgin jar of peanut butter:
since the early ’70s, I had my own term for it: the Jif Clif.
You’re welcome to steal it.

Road Rider
Reply to  Bill Thompson
January 21, 2024 10:51 PM

I’ve done my share of injection molding and plastic extrusion. We used to call the last bit “sprue goo”….and if it happened, we were doing something very wrong in the process.

Susan Marcell
January 14, 2024 3:41 PM

My husband & i had chickens. I offered my brother-in-law some eggs and he said ‘no thanks, i only like the kind that come from the grocery store’!!? I had worked with another man who seriously did not know milk came from cows, don’t know where he thought it came from and really didn’t get into it. But i’m scared what would/will happen if these snowflakes are without Doordash.

Karl Schweitzer
Reply to  Susan Marcell
January 14, 2024 9:41 PM

I had a customer who, back in the 60s I think she said, had some new neighbors move out to the little town from a big city. They also thought milk just came from the store. She took the kids her age over to the farm that was maybe a few houses down and showed them the cows and the milking, but from what she said to me, I think she thought she didn’t quite convince them it was the same milk they got in the store.

Daniel Cutshall
January 14, 2024 12:52 PM

This has been a beautiful, might I even say delicious episode gentlemen. May I especially thank Steve for the wonderful image that he left us with!!!

Last edited 1 month ago by Daniel Cutshall
ACTS (TM)
January 14, 2024 11:21 AM

I have to compliment my little sister. We grew up on a farm but she moved to Los Angeles many, many years ago. Thank God she moved out of Los Angeles and here where I live a year after I left that dung heap. She married a city boy and they have a son. When my nephew was little and just learning to talk she referred to whatever meat was on the menu at their house by the sound the animal it came from makes. “Cluck”, “Moo” and “Oink” were chicken, beef and pork respectively. As in; fried cluck, moo… Read more »

Susan Marcell
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 14, 2024 3:43 PM

We used to pit bbq a pig for parties. We raised a few of them and my daughter helped. After my husband killed 1 to pit it, she said no way she’d eat it, but after it came out of the pit and smelled so good she quickly changed her mind.

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Susan Marcell
January 15, 2024 5:48 AM

When I was growing up we raised hogs, sheep, chickens and cattle. My paternal grandpa even had both dairy and beef cattle. I learned at a very young age not to give individual names to my food supply. Not to personify something I was going to end up eating. I think this was a very important life lesson. I have a very good friend who didn’t grow up on a farm and to my way of seeing things he’s absurdly squeamish about dispatching food animals and varmints. He’s not a vegetarian either, he loves my BBQ’d Country Style Ribs. He… Read more »

Karl Schweitzer
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 11:55 AM

We had small animals when I was younger, goats, rabbits and chickens mostly.

When my brother’s workplace was going to raise some chickens for meat, he did name them, but in an ironic way. His coworkers were a bit less happy about the names his picked though: Ranch, Bbq and Honey mustard.

Susan Marcell
Reply to  Karl Schweitzer
January 29, 2024 10:48 AM

My dad would name his steers Tbone, Porterhouse,etc

ACTS (TM)
January 14, 2024 11:10 AM

Hmmm … plants … well … All biological energy on Earth originates with our star, Sol, most commonly known as ‘the sun’. From the various components of sunlight plants convert solar energy and soil/water nutrients into sugars and other carbohydrates plus some lipids and proteins. Then animals eat those plants and concentrate even more solar energy. Plants are concentrated sunlight. Meat is simply highly concentrated sunlight. This is what is known as “the food chain”. I have to wonder if they’re still teaching this in school anymore? Humans, thankfully being omnivores, can choose which stage of energy concentration we want… Read more »

Karl Schweitzer
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 14, 2024 9:54 PM

Around my area, a number of the middle schools are teaching crops and letting the kids plant, water, weed and harvest little garden plots on the school grounds, so it is taught in places. We’re a generally rural area, there is a 25,000 population city in the county, a 60k as the largest in the one south and 270 in the capital to the west plus whatever is in its suburbs. I have read that some other cities are using vacant plots for community gardens and other related activities, but I also fear the teaching is not wide spread enough.… Read more »

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Karl Schweitzer
January 15, 2024 6:57 AM

I agree with all that with a couple of minor quibbles. Bears are edible and delicious. Bear tastes so much like beef that if it’s properly killed, handled and prepared you can pass it off for beef to anyone that is not intimately familiar with bear meat. I know this to be true because I have done just that and not told someone they’re eating bear until after they finished eating it. Bear roast in a crock pot tastes nearly identical to a beef roast prepared the same way. The weird thing about bear hunting is that once you get… Read more »

Ron Swansons Alter Ego
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 8:17 AM

I recall the first time this (mostly) city boy saw each of the following: Moose – next to the road in North Bay Ontario. I had thought moose were just big deer. Uh, no. That is a massive creature and would ruin your day. I know it can run faster than I can and I am not going to piss it off. I asked my client what he had in the SUV for dangerous animals like moose and bear, the .45 was a welcome sight, but I looked at that moose again and thought only if you shoot it in… Read more »

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Ron Swansons Alter Ego
January 15, 2024 9:31 AM

I hope I didn’t come across as slagging on Karl, that wasn’t my intent. If a battle hardened Marine Corps Officer with extensive combat experience who became a Federal Agent with the balls to go up against an armed man in the wilderness alone can make that mistake … Karl’s in good company. It’s good of you to look at this sort of thing with a practical and reasonable view. With you that doesn’t surprise me. It has been my experience that most people who do not hunt, have not spent time in real wilderness and do not have practical… Read more »

Karl Schweitzer
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 11:50 AM

I will take a quibble with your quibble, but also admit I shouldn’t have said AR15 but a more generic “gun” or something. Idea being, we’re on the top of the food chain with the intelligence to make tools that make us dangerous enough to stay there. The quibble was domestication, and the video was about using animals for work or keeping them for food, thus the bear, tiger and such were discounted being too much work or too dangerous. Antelope and deer were out of the picture as well, being too fast or too good at jumping to be… Read more »

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Harry Ferguson
January 16, 2024 6:47 AM

I’ve been in the water with wild dolphins and yes, they’re pretty big compared to humans and I’m not a particularly small human. A 10 foot long, 400 lb. mammal with a mouthful of pointy one inch teeth is pretty impressive up close and personal. I’m glad they like us. Which they seem to do. I’m not aware of a dolphin ever attacking a human being in the wild. Which is a very impressive record for something that big and toothy. I also grew up with horses. We didn’t have any Clydesdales or Percherons or any of the really, really… Read more »

Ron Swansons Alter Ego
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 8:06 AM

Humans, thankfully being omnivores, can choose which stage of energy concentration we want to consume from.

Enjoy this while you can – signed the WHO/UN/WEF et. al.

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Ron Swansons Alter Ego
January 15, 2024 9:40 AM

Now THAT’S something Karl and enough friends with AR15s might be able to do something about!

Karl Schweitzer
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 15, 2024 11:52 AM

With my eyesight and left handed shooting, I expect I would be better doing the reloading for people with better accuracy. Political pushback with the normal people that do not pay attention to such things is where I can probably make more difference.

Susan Marcell
Reply to  ACTS (TM)
January 29, 2024 10:50 AM

Until you run into a grizzly, then you can discuss the top of the food chain 😉

ACTS (TM)
Reply to  Susan Marcell
January 29, 2024 11:08 AM

Lol, if I’m someplace where it’s possible for me to run into a grizzly, the grizzly is in a lot more danger than I am. I’m not a city boy who thinks “the animals will all be nice if you’re nice to them”. I go into the woods appropriately prepared for what might be out there 🙂

David B
January 14, 2024 11:00 AM

Saw a package of plant based mashed potatoes the other day. Best aromas ever: newly opened can of coffee, newly opened jar of Skippy Roasted PB.